Healthy Whole Grain Matcha Pancakes

Healthy Whole Grain Matcha Pancakes

These healthy matcha pancakes are for true matcha lovers. Made with oats and Greek yogurt, these hearty flapjacks will keep you nice and full all morning. 

This post was originally posted on 4/8/16. The photos, content, and recipe have since been updated. This post also contains affiliate links.

Matcha pancakes are a colorful, healthy way to start your day! 

It’s no secret that I LOVE pancakes. 

Blueberry, chocolate chip, lemon – I’m not picky. However, there is one thing that I want out of my short-stack: filling power. 

And these healthy matcha oatmeal pancakes do not disappoint, as one serving has 18 grams of protein and 5 grams of fiber. 

Stack of healthy matcha pancakes with blueberries and greek yogurt on top

These use to be whole wheat matcha pancakes 

If you’ve been following THT from the beginning, you may notice that this recipe used to be called whole wheat matcha pancakes.

So why did I change it? 

As much as I love using white whole wheat flour in pancakes, oat flour is a slightly more nutritious option that also makes these matcha pancakes gluten-free. 

Now, oat flour does result in a slightly heartier consistency (which I love), if you’re not gluten-free you can still use 1 cup of white whole wheat flour instead for a slightly more delicate crumb. 

Fork with bites of healthy matcha pancakes on it

What is matcha powder? 

Matcha powder comes from the same plant as green tea leaves. However, the plants used for matcha are exposed to less sunlight in order to boost chlorophyll production and amino acid production. 

Another difference is that matcha powder is made from the entire tea leaf, giving it more caffeine and antioxidants than traditional green tea. 

When buying matcha powder, cheaper isn’t always better. There are different grades of matcha powder, some of which are going to be especially bitter. 

I recommend buying ceremonial-grade matcha from a reputable company. My go-to is Encha Ceremonial-Grade

And to avoid making these oatmeal pancakes overly sweet, be sure to use an unsweetened matcha powder. 

bowl of matcha powder

How to make healthy matcha pancakes 

Ready to get flipping?! Let’s discuss what you’ll need as well as some tips for making a short-stack worthy of a trendy cafe. 

What You’ll Need 

  • Rolled oats 
  • Matcha powder
  • Baking soda and powder
  • Salt 
  • Greek yogurt 
  • Milk or milk alternative 
  • Egg
  • Honey
  • Vanilla extract 
dry ingredients for healthy matcha pancakes in mixing bowl

Tips for making pancakes 

While pancakes are easy to make, there are a few key tips for keeping these matcha oatmeal pancakes from becoming unpleasantly dense. 

1. Room temperature ingredients mix better. 

Want to know the secret of whisking enough air into your pancake batter for a light and fluffy texture? Using room temperature ingredients. 

I like to set out my yogurt, milk, and egg about 30 minutes before making the pancake batter. 

2. Making a well in the dry ingredients will help prevent over-mixing. 

If you’ve made pancakes before, then you know the most important thing is not to over-mix your batter. One way to do this is by making a well in your dry ingredients to pour the wet ingredients into. 

It’s simple, but doing this will help your ingredients blend together a bit faster, which means less mixing needed. And less mixing = lighter and fluffier pancakes. 

Healthy matcha pancake batter

3. Use butter for greasing your skillet. 

These healthy matcha pancakes don’t use any butter or oil in the batter, but I do highly recommend using a little butter to grease your skillet or griddle with. 

By using butter for greasing, you can add a little buttery flavor to each pancake. And let’s be honest, pancakes should taste at least a little buttery. 

4. Don’t flip too early. 

This healthy matcha pancake batter is thick, which means that they also take a bit longer to cook than other recipes you may have made in the past. 

To avoid ending up with undercooked flapjacks, make sure to cool low and slow, flipping only when the pancakes are actually ready. 

Here are some signs that your pancakes are ready to flip: 

  • Edges look set. 
  • The bubbles that appear on top of the batter during cooking have popped. 
  • The bottom of the pancake is a light golden brown. 
pouring syrup over stack of healthy matcha pancakes

How to top these healthy matcha pancakes 

Usually I top my flapjacks with peanut butter rather than maple syrup. However, I’m not a huge fan of combining peanut butter and matcha. 

Instead, I tend to keep these simple by adding a dollop of Greek yogurt, some berries, and a drizzle of either pure maple syrup or honey. 

When I’m in the mood for a super filling breakfast, I’ll add a scrambled egg on the side or top them with vanilla almond butter. 

stack of healthy matcha pancakes

More healthy matcha recipes 

Love matcha? Here are a few more recipes to use it in!

Pin This Recipe For Later!

Healthy Whole Grain Matcha Pancakes

Healthy Whole Grain Matcha Pancakes

Filling whole grain pancakes with a delicate green tea flavor.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Healthy, Matcha, Pancakes, Whole Grain
Servings: 2
Calories: 322kcal
Author: Kelli McGrane MS, RD

Ingredients

  • 1 cup oats, pulsed into a flour
  • 1 tablespoon Matcha Green Tea Powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup original oat milk can sub in any milk of choice
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt I used full-fat, but you can also use low-fat or fat-free
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • Optional toppings such as maple syrup, almond butter, Greek yogurt, berries, or banana slices

Instructions

  • Combine oat flour, matcha powder, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Set aside.
  • In a smaller mixing bowl, whisk together oat milk, Greek yogurt, egg, honey, and vanilla extract.
  • Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour wet ingredients into the well, whisking continuously. Continue to whisk until just combined — you still want a few lumps. Let the mixture rest while skillet heats up.
  • Heat a griddle or large skillet over medium-low heat. Once the surface is hot, lightly grease with butter or cooking spray.
  • Using a ¼ measuring cup, spoon pancake batter onto greased pan. Once the edges of the pancakes start to look set and the bubbles on the top of the pancakes start to pop, quickly flip each pancake.
  • Cook for another 1-2 minutes, or until the bottom is lightly browned. Place cooked pancakes on a plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter.

Notes

Nutrition for ½ of recipe: 322 calories, 8 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 46 g carbs, 5 g fiber, 15 g sugar, 18 g protein

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1 Comment

  • Donna Vitiello - Brooks AvatarDonna Vitiello - Brooks4 years ago

    Yummy

  • About Kelli McGrane Headshot

    I’m Kelli MS, RD, and my mission is to prove that eating healthier doesn’t have to be complicated or restrictive. Follow along to learn more about food and cooking, with an emphasis on breakfast and sweet treats!

    About Kelli McGrane Headshot

    Welcome to The Healthy Toast!

    Here you’ll find healthy breakfast recipes designed by a registered dietitian with your health goals in mind.

    As a dietitian I understand that a healthy breakfast is essential for giving you the fuel you need to power through your day. Which is why on TheHealthyToast, you’ll find nutrition guides plus the best healthy breakfast recipes for every diet and lifestyle.

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